FAQ Before Purchase
 



What is an e-bike?
An electric bike, or E-bike has an electric powered motor hub which is designed to assist with pedalling rather than powering the bike without input from the rider. When riding up a hill, the motor will activate to help you reach a better cruising speed on an incline to make it easier to ride. Magicycle’s motor hub can be located rear wheel.

Do I need a license to ride a e-bike?
Magicycle Class II, also known as “speed pedelec,” can also have up to only a 750w motor (aka 1 horsepower), the original set up is 20 mph, but you can adjust up to 28 mph. It is allowed in most states and cities without the need for a license. 

A e-bike is not a real bike.
A e-bike is a regular bike with the addition of an electrical drive system. This includes a battery, a motor, a way to integrate the motor’s power into the drivetrain, and a way to control that power. You still need to pedal an electric bike.

What states require a license to ride an eBike?
In States where eBikes are classified as mopeds or scooters, they usually require licensing and registration. Alabama, Alaska, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Mexico, Wisconsin, and North Dakota currently require a license to operate an eBike. States using the three-tiered classification system usually exempt electric bikes from registration, licensure, or insurance requirements.

How old do you have to be to ride an e-bike?
Age restrictions for eBikes vary from state to state and are often only applicable to Class 2 or Class 3 electric bikes.
Eight states require riders to be 14 or over to ride unaccompanied all classification levels. These states are Alabama, Alaska, Michigan, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Utah, and Virginia. In some states, riders under this age can still ride electric bikes when supervised by an adult over 18.
Six states have eBike regulations, which require riders to be 15 years or older, and fifteen states require riders to be over 16. There are some state-specific exceptions to these rules if an adult accompanies the rider. Many states do not have an official age requirement to ride, but most of those states require riders under either 16 or 18 to wear helmets.

Do I need insurance to ride an e-bike?
Few states, West Virginia, North Dakota, and New Mexico, require e-bike insurance. States which consider e-bikes as distinct from motor vehicles do not require the insurance requirements that standard motor vehicles are subject to. 
Several states see e-bikes as motor vehicles akin to mopeds and require the same license and registration requirements. However, most of those states do not require e-bike insurance. Although driver's insurance is rarely needed, you may wish to add your electric bike to your home and contents insurance to protect against theft or damage. 
 
Is an e-bike really a good way to exercise?
E-bikes are just like traditional bikes, you still need to pedal, but you have the option of the pedal assist or throttle on hills or longer commutes to help you cycle further with less strain on your body. Reports presents that e-bikes require the same level of exercise as a regular bike, as they increase the heart-rate and require pedalling just like a traditional bike.
 
What is the difference between Magicycle all-terrain cruiser and Magicycle all-terrain step through cruiser?
Step-through bikes offer riders the most upright riding position and will also be the easiest for riders to mount and dismount by simply stepping through the curved frame.
Step thru bikes are extremely easy to get on and off. They are a fantastic option for riders that don't have a complete range of motion, and are particularly great for older riders or riders who have a difficult time lifting their leg over a traditional bike frame or for riders recovering from injuries.
Additionally, step-thru bikes are an excellent alternative for individuals carrying parcels or continuously find themselves in stop-and-go traffic. If you have your bike loaded up with several boxes and bags, a step-thru bike can be an excellent bike for riders who need to jump off the seat multiple times throughout the day quickly.
Step-through bikes are also great if you are commuting to work, and have to wear formal attire that may not be as flexible, this can include a suit or dress or skirt, allowing you to get on and off the bike with ease and without breaking a sweat.

Can I test ride the bike?
We are sorry to say currently we do not offer test rides. We are hoping to provide you this service soon.

Where can I get another key for the bike?
If you purchased the e-bike from magicyclebike.com, you can email us at support@magicyclebike.com to get more keys.

Maximum weight
The maximum total weight of the cycle, rider and luggage should never exceed 275 lbs (124 Kg).

Maximum controller amps

The maximum controller amps of Magicycle Cruiser Ebike are 22 amps.

E-Bike definitions & classifications by state:

Alaska:  Alaska considers electric bicycles as a "motor-driven cycle" and requires a license and registration.
 
Alabama: Alabama uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
Arkansas: Arkansas uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated in the same manner as traditional bikes.
 
Arizona: Arizona adheres to the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
California: California adheres to the three-tiered classification of eBikes. E-Bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bicycles.
 
Colorado: Colorado uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated in the same way as traditional bicycles.
 
Connecticut: Connecticut uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated in the same manner as traditional bikes.
 
Delaware: Delaware defines eBikes as a "bicycle" as long as the motor is under 750w and the bike has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Florida: Florida considers electric bikes to fall under the definition of a "bicycle" capable of being operated by human power.
 
Georgia: Georgia uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Hawaii: Hawaii classifies electric bikes as "low-speed electric bicycles" when used with a max speed of 20 mph.
 
Iowa: Iowa defines an electric bike as a "bicycle" as long as its motor is under 750w and the bike has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Idaho: Idaho uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. E-Bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Illinois: Illinois adheres to the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Indiana: Indiana uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. E-Bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Kansas: The state of Kansas defines an eBike as an "electric-assisted bicycle" as long as its motor is under 1000w and has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Kentucky: In Kentucky, an electric bicycle is considered a "bicycle" as long it has operable pedals.
 
Louisiana: An electric bicycle is considered a "motorized bicycle" in Louisiana as long as it reaches a maximum speed of 25 mph.
 
Massachusetts: The state of Massachusetts defines an eBike as a "motorized bicycle" as long as the bike does not exceed a maximum speed of 25 mph. Riders must carry a license and may be subject to registration requirements.
 
Maryland: Maryland uses the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Maine: Maine adheres to the three-tiered classification of eBikes. E-Bikes are regulated in the same way as traditional bikes.
 
Michigan: Michigan regulates e-Bikes like traditional bicycles, and the three-tiered classification is used for electric bikes.
 
Minnesota: Minnesota defines eBikes as an "electric-assisted bicycle." Bikes in this category must be equipped with a motor under 1000w and a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Missouri: Missouri defines an electric bicycle as a "motorized bicycle" if it reaches a maximum speed of 30 mph.
 
Mississippi: Mississippi defines an electric bicycle as a "bicycle with a motor attached."
 
Montana: Montana defines an electric bicycle as an "electric-assisted bicycle." A bike can be placed in this category if it has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
North Carolina: North Carolina defines an e-bike as an "electric-assisted bicycle" if its motor is under 1000w and it has a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
North Dakota: The state of North Dakota defines an e-bike as a "motorized bicycle." eBikes are subject to the same rules, licensing, registration, and insurance requirements as motor vehicles.
 
Nebraska: Nebraska defines eBikes as an "electric-assisted bicycle." Bikes in this category must have a motor under 750w, and a maximum speed of 20 mph, with pedals operated by human power.
 
New Hampshire: New Hampshire follows the three-tiered classification of electric bikes. E-Bikes are regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
New Jersey: The NJ definition includes only the first two tiers of classifications used by other states. The legislature also defines "motorized bicycles" as a device that operates over 20 mph with a maximum motor-assisted speed of 28 miles per hour. This definition closely aligns with the Class 3 definition used in other states.
 
New Mexico: New Mexico defines an eBike as a "moped." They are subject to the same road rules, licensing, and insurance requirements applicable to motor vehicles.
 
Nevada: The state of Nevada defines an e-bike as an "electric bicycle." Bikes fall in this category when the motor is under 750w, with a maximum speed of 20 mph, and pedals operated by human power.
 
New York: New York state defines electric bikes as bicycles if they have an electric motor of less than 750w and have fully functional pedals.
 
Ohio: In Ohio, the three-tiered classification is used for electric bicycles, with E-Bikes regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
Oklahoma: Oklahoma follows the three-tiered classification of eBikes. Electric bicycles are regulated in the same way as traditional bicycles.
 
Oregon: Oregon defines an e-bike as an "electric-assisted bicycle" if the motor is under 1000w and the bike has a max speed of 20miles per hour.
 
Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania defines an electric bicycle as a "pedalcycle with electric assist." An eBikes falls in this category if the motor is under 750w. It must have operable pedals but a maximum speed of 20 mph when powered solely by the engine. Additionally, the bike must weigh no more than 100 pounds and follow the road's same rules as a traditional bicycle.
 
Rhode Island: Rhode Island defines e-bikes as "electric motorized bicycles." E-bikes must have fully operable pedals, a max power output of 1491w, and a top speed of 25 mph.
 
South Carolina: South Carolina currently has no specific classification for electric bikes. However, since e-bikes are vehicles, they should follow standard vehicle road rules.
 
South Dakota: In South Dakota, the three-tiered classification is used for electric bicycles, with E-Bikes regulated like traditional bicycles.
Tennessee: Tennessee uses the three-tiered classifications for electric bicycles. E-Bikes are regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
Texas: The state of Texas uses the three-tiered classification for electric bicycles, with E-Bikes regulated like traditional bicycles.
 
Utah: In Utah, E-Bikes are regulated like traditional bicycles, and the three-tiered classification for electric bikes applies.
 
Virginia: E-bikes in Virginia are classified as "electric power-assisted bicycles" if they have a motor under 1000w and operable pedals. The max speed for all bicycles and eBikes is 25 mph.
 
Vermont: Vermont categorizes e-bikes as "motor-assisted bicycles." E-Bikes are subject to the same laws as traditional bicycles if they have fully operable pedals. The motor should have a max power output of 1000w and a maximum speed of 20 mph.
 
Washington: Washington state regulates eBikes like traditional bicycles, and the three-tiered classification is used for electric bikes.
 
Wisconsin: Wisconsin defines an e-bike as a "motor-bicycle" if the motor is under 750w and has a maximum speed of 20 mph. Wisconsin requires electric bikes to be registered, and riders must have a valid license.
 
West Virginia: West Virginia defines an electric bicycle as a "moped." E-Bikes must adhere to the exact licensing and insurance requirements that apply to motor vehicles.
 
Wyoming: In Wyoming, eBikes are regulated like traditional bicycles, and the state uses the three-tiered classification for electric bikes.